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minutes from now. until then a look at comments by u.s. army chief of staff general ray odierno. he said friday the greatest threat facing our nation is fiscal uncertainty and potential budget shortfalls. >> good morning, everyone. i'm mike owe hand lan and on behalf of peter singer and everyone else here at bookings, for the 21st century hearing on intelligence. we're welcome to have general ray odierno to speak in what could not be a more important week for american defense policy making. you're aware of budget challenges of the process and how these can affect our men and women in uniform and future military planning and current operations. no one could be a more distinguished and thoughtful person who discuss these matters than general odierno who i have great honor to know a dozen years now. he has been a friend of brookings and the a friend of the broader defense community and he has been a distinguished servant in our nation's military and our nation's defense throughout that period. he took the fourth infantry division to iraq and presided over its operations, directed its operat
american and u.s. air in the really raleigh market? >> we -- the overlap, i think is just on the washington, d.c., flight. american serves the hubs for raleigh we serve our hubs from there. i think the overlap is limited to the one flight. >> all right. and i noticed -- and the prices on american and u.s. airways are virtually the same flying out of raleigh occur ram to d.c. how much overlap do you have in charlotte. >> virtually zero. we have a very large connecting hub in charlotte. >> all right. i believe u.s. air serves d.c. out of charlotte, i think they are probably the carrier that has the most flights out of charlotte to d.c. what years years would you anticipate the price difference is from raleigh to d.c. and charlotte to d.c. is? >> i don't know. it sounds like you might know. [laughter] >> it costas lot more money to fly from charlotte to d.c. than raleigh to washington. that's concerning. it's very concerning. and you're direct competitors in a route from raleigh to washington where as u.s. airways it doesn't have a direct competitor, so it costs more money. that would certainl
commander of u.s. forces in iraq general loy austin to lead the command which is responsible for operations of middle east and afghanistan. general austin was joined by u.s. command nominee general david rodriguez who is a top commander in afghanistan from 2007 to 2011. this hearing is chaired by carl levin of michigan. it is two hours. >> good morning everybody and welcome this morning that committee considers the nomination of two very distinguished officers to the two of the most active and challenging combatant commands. general lloyd austin united states army nominated to the commander u.s. central command, and general david rodriquez, u.s. army to be nominated to be commander of the u.s. africa command. fees' to combat and commands, centcom and africom are the centers of gravity for the military's operations to counter the threat of terrorism. both nominees have served the country with distinction, and i want to faint each of you for your decades of military service and a willingness to serve once again. i and stand general austin's life and rodriguez's life are with us this morning.
about how the project is crucial to u.s. energy security. working with canada for our energy rather than getting it from the middle east. the letter talks about thousands of jobs at the -- that the project creates, not only building this $7 billion pipeline but that all the jobs that go to the refineries and the other activities that go with it and talks about safety, efficiency and reliability. now, the letter concludes mr. president, we consider the keystone x.l. pipeline fundamentally important to the future economic prosperity of both the united states and canada. we strongly urge you to issue a presidential permit and act swiftly to approve the keystone x.l. pipeline, signed by governors -- now, remember, senator baucus and i have been working on the effort on behalf of montana. you have got nebraska here. governor heineman just sent a letter in. now here are some of the other governors on this letter. sam brownback from kansas, the governors of north dakota and south dakota, governor mary fallon from oklahoma, governor rick perry from texas. in addition to other governors that aren
'm looking forward to working with the ranking member ron barber as we both share a strong commitment to u.s. border security and ensuring our border agents receive the support that they need to protect the homeland. last september, ron and i attended the dedication ceremony of the bryant a kerry border patrol station in arizona on wrangled patrol agent brian terry who was killed in december 2010 in the line of duty in arizona. also look forward to a strong bipartisan cooperation in helping to make the department of homeland security as efficient and effective as possible. i would also like to introduce our new freshman majority members. today we have mr. kief rothfuss from pennsylvania and mr. richard hudson of north carolina, and later joining us will be mr. steven gaines of montana. they bring a wealth of experience to their new roles in the congress and on the subcommittee at a look forward to leveraging their experience and knowledge to provide effective oversight of dhs. let me pause for just a minute and think the subcommittee staff who have worked diligently to put this first hearing
. lowering the direct cost of energy is key to helping the u.s. economy recover and prosper. absolutely key. next is clean. as we attempt to minimize indirect costs or the externalities by driving up these prices -- again, i would suggest that this is a policy that's doomed to economic and practical failure. instead, we have to be aware of the impacts of every type of energy and make rational, informed decisions on what is acceptable, what needs to be mitigated, how do we do just that. our challenge here is to reduce the cost of cleaner sources of energy, not raise the cost of existing sources. and when we talk about clean, what we've tried to do in this report is to give it some definition here. too often "clean" is treated as an absolute. but i would contend that it is better regarded as a comparison. a better definition of clean in my view and what we have used in this report is less intensive in global lifestyle impacts than its likeliest alternative. so just consider that. less global -- less intensive in global lifestyle impacts. so next, diversity. every type of energy clearly has it
's number-one priority will be taking care of our troops. he is a veterans' advocate with the u.s.o. and he's won the respect and admiration of veterans' groups, in addition he's won the support of an extraordinary array of former secretaries of defense, ambassadors and diplomats, senior retired military leaders and in particular, two former members of this body who appeared with him at his testimony, former senators warren and nunn. i believe that chuck hagel is the right man for the challenges, the fiscal challenges that will confront the department of defense. put aside sequester, which i dearly hope will not happen, secretary panetta said it would be irresponsible for the congress to allow it to happen. many of us agree, it must be avoided. but apart from that challenge in the next month, or series of months, the long-term outlook for the department of defense is that it must do more with less, and secretary hagel, if he is confirmed, will have that management task, and he is one of the people in this country who is almost uniquely qualified to carry it out. and i believe that he will w
's nominee to be u.s. representative to the united nations. now some presidents include that position in their cabinet. some do not. but astpraoeud that singular insurance -- aside from that sing latin incident which i pointous was the democrats saying they're going to filibuster a nominee by the president and deny him a seat, so far as i've been able to tell there's not been ever an instant in the history of the senate where republicans have used a filibuster to deny a cabinet member an up-or-down vote when nominated by a president. that only leaves appellate judge nominations, circuit judge nominees. up until 2003, so far as i've been able to find, the rule of the senate was that the president's nominees to be on the federal courts of appeal always received an up-or-down vote. they were decided by a vote of 51. then our friends on the democratic side when president bush became president decided they didn't like that, and they changed the practice. they began to filibuster president bush's judges for up or down -- to deny them their seats. i had just arrived in the senate in 2003, mr
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8